Unidentified Flying Objects?

“Are they really thinking like that again?” Tremel asked.

Rodel just shrugged and continued on with their reconnaissance. They were almost done with their tour of duty and he was looking forward to being able to stay at home for the holidays, The Solstice was coming up soon and he’d made plans with his mother’s family to be at home during it. He was really looking forward to the food and the company that would be there.

Tremel sighed as he spun around in his chair, “When will our reliefs get here?” he grumbled to himself, knowing that his partner wasn’t listening.

Rodel just shrugged as he continued to keep his mind and eyes on the gathering of people in front of them. It was hard to keep his focus when he’d thought of home, but he wasn’t going to get lazy and miss something important.

Others in the past had messed up more than once when they grew lazy and didn’t keep themselves out of sight of the locals they were observing. Luckily no one had been hurt too badly, but it was very bad form to be seen when you were running a very clandestine reconnaissance mission.

“I’ll be glad when we can get home to Antarctica, watching how slowly the rest of the world is developing is a real buzz kill if you aren’t one of those snobs who think we’re  better than everyone else.”

Rodel chuckled and finally made eye contact with his partner, “I know, imagine the rest of the world thinking we’re some kind of aliens from another planet spying on them in strange flying saucers when it’s really just been fellow humans all along.”


Written partially because I had a random thought years ago that went something like this:

What if all those UFOs were really from other humans who were much more advanced, but lived in Antarctica using their advanced tech to hide from us all? What if the UFOs were just them seeing how advanced the rest of us currently are?

Also, because of the prompt from last Friday’s FreeWriteFriday: http://kellieelmore.com/2014/05/16/fwf-free-write-friday-just-write-special-edition/

I don’t know if I will ever write more for this idea, but it was an interesting thought.

Compassion Through Technology

As you’re sitting at your computer or holding your phone or reading this on a tablet or eReader pretending to be a tablet (you know they are, I know they are, the eReader knows they are), are you thinking about the technology that you’re using? What all are you using it for? What does it mean to you that you can talk to your family wherever you and they are provided that they also have access to the same technology that you’re currently using?

I know that I didn’t often think about the technology that I use daily and just what it means. There are times that I have:

-being able to call 911 for my mother when she had a stroke

-keeping in contact with family when they are all scattered throughout the States doing something with their lives

-being able to attend college even though I’m only awake at night for a few years

-knowing that my niece’s eye was saved from infection because of medical technology that didn’t exist when I was her age at the time

But I don’t think about these things often. I just plop down on the sofa and pull up my laptop to surf through the internet in a way that I couldn’t when I was a teen.

It’s because of this surfing that I do now as an adult that I came across a use for technology that combines several of the things that I only sometimes think about.

A young woman came to the United States with her new husband last year in 2013. She was smart and educated and was looking to further her education in Minnesota. She wasn’t able to do that, but it is what happened after she was admitted into the hospital that really made me think about the technology that I take for granted every single day.

This young woman, Sanaz Nezami was sent to the hospital with severe head injuries and due to severe swelling of her brain there was no blood flow in her brain. Her family lived in Iran and they would never be able to make it through all the red tape in order to make it over in time for her funeral, much less be able to visit her in the hospital. The hospital staff were able to set up a laptop with a webcam in her room to make it possible for her family to keep tabs on her and to see her.

This isn’t something you think of for use with our technology unless it’s dealing with business or the military. Everyone involved were civilians and/or hospital staff. It was a simple laptop to laptop connection that is easily setup using devices bought at a Wal-mart.

I have heard of families being able to attend a wedding via the web, but have never seen a family from so far away be able to keep eyes on their daughter/sister/cousin/friend who was in the hospital and dying. The staff at the hospital would make sure to talk not only with the patient who was never able to respond but with her family at the same time and complete requests for said family so that their daughter/sister/cousin/friend knew she was loved even as she was dying and unable to see or react or possibly even hear for herself. She would hopefully be able to feel the fingers that brushed back her hair and placed a gentle kiss on her brow before she died.

Source:

http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=157&sid=28203588&title=nurses-family-bond-online-as-iranian-dies-in-us

Perspective

Sometimes I sit and wonder about what I’m seeing. The world has changed so much since I was a little girl that I scarcely recognize it. I’ve been on this earth less than three decades and yet if my sisters’ children were in my age because of some plot device (like time travel) then they would be very surprised with how little technology we had available for everyday use. Newspapers were still flung onto steps and the white pages were delivered at the same time as the yellow pages instead of needing to be requested.

Every morning before school started in my third grade class, I could look out across the valley I lived in from the Eastern benches and see large squares of green where farms were. Those large squares of green have steadily given way to more suburbs and roads. There are few farms still in my valley that are view-able from so great a distance. Those that do exist are scattered so that they could just as well be an equestrian or city part (both are few here as well).

My middle school is gone as well, the students temporarily transferred to another while the old one is completely demolished and then, hopefully, rebuilt. It’s boiler finally threw in its final towel and refused to be fixed after over 50 years of service. The tunnels and bomb shelters beneath the former brick behemoth having to be filled in as well in order to have a more sound foundation after years of disuse. Some of the teachers here taught families by the generation.

( Here was roll call on the first day I had Biology:

“I taught your mom and your dad and both of your parents.”

It went like this down several rows until he got to me.

“And I had all five of your sisters.”

There’s something like 11 years between the eldest of my sisters and the youngest. My parents were actually older than the teacher, but all the other parents were younger than him.)

Sending e-cards was considered too informal for any kind of social gathering and were discouraged for personal use as well because they weren’t considered ‘enough.’ Talking on the phone when having a guest over wasn’t rude and hardly anyone in my schools even knew what anime was. Google was an infant, YouTube didn’t exist and being able to purchase any songs online was the cause for scandal as the recording companies cried foul. There were chat rooms starting to become popular and online forums were starting up. Meeting people online was still considered nothing more than play time and not taken seriously unless they wanted to ‘meet in real life.’

Time spent online wasn’t real to people even as it slowly started to take up more and more of their actual time from their ‘real’ lives.

When you were bullied at school it was either face to face or behind the cupped hands of gossip. There wasn’t an online media service where you could target someone from across the country for whatever reason bullies use to justify their behavior. Hatred still existed and so did jealousy, it was just a little more like dirt in your face and snowballs hiding rocks and pine cones thrown full strength at the back of your heard and less like written victimization and the ruination of someone’s character in the online community.

Any kind of online community stayed online and didn’t bleed into daily life as much before. Networking was done face to face in the flesh and not over a screen.

There’s so much more to mention, but not enough time in which to do so.

So what will the next ten years bring for me to see and live through? Perspective is always changing.

Prompt for this: http://writegear.wordpress.com/2013/10/02/writers-block-41/comment-page-1/#comment-77